Hospital exec Nabel, criticized for her work with NFL, defends her neutrality

first_img Related: Later that day, she wrote Koroshetz that “a Dr. Stern, who may also be with this group, has filed independent testimony in the NFL/Players Association settlement.”Indeed, Stern was critical of how the settlement would be administered, pointing out flaws with the neuropsychological tests that the league proposed using to determine how to compensate injured players.“I hope this group is able to approach their research in an unbiased manner,” Nabel’s email continued, the report says.Nabel sent Stern’s testimony to Koroshetz, according to the report.“My sole objective,” Nabel said in her statement, was to ask her former NIH colleagues to “ensure there were no conflicts of interest among grant applicants.”The NIH found no conflicts involving the grant review panel and stuck with its decision to award the grant to the Stern group. It ended up using internal funds, not the NFL money, to pay for the grant.The NIH told STAT it agrees with the “characterization of events in the report.”The committee staff declined to provide copies of Nabel’s emails to STAT. Nabel, director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute from 2005-2009, declined to be interviewed, but a Brigham spokeswoman answered questions posed by STAT in writing.She said Nabel contacted Dr. Thomas Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, soon after becoming an NFL adviser in February 2015, to propose a collaboration “to explore the interface between head trauma and behavioral health.” That led to followup discussions with other NIH officials, including Koroshetz.“Months later, when representatives from the NFL’s Head, Neck, and Spine Committee expressed concerns about potential conflicts of interest among grant applicants, Dr. Nabel contacted Dr. Koroshetz to bring the concerns to his attention,” the spokeswoman said. “At no time did she raise, nor did they discuss, allocation of funds.” Dr. Elizabeth Nabel speaks during a NFL health and safety update in San Francisco in February. Gregory Payan/AP Please enter a valid email address. By Bob Tedeschi and Ike Swetlitz May 25, 2016 Reprints NFL ‘improperly attempted to influence’ concussion research funding After a public fall, the face of NFL concussion denial resurfaces Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Leave this field empty if you’re human: The report says that in June 2015, Koroshetz proposed funding additional research, in a call with other NFL representatives, to “address the NFL’s concerns.”Nabel was also involved in discussions with Koroshetz about funding additional studies, according to her spokeswoman. “She was working through the appropriate channels to ensure this important research be conducted in a way that would yield the best possible science,” the spokeswoman said.According to a letter sent this March by Democratic members of the House committee to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, Nabel later wrote in an email to the FNIH and an NFL official last August that a collaboration of three research groups “would be ideal and would dilute the voice of a more marginal group.”Other NFL representatives contacted both Koroshetz and the FNIH, which was to manage communication between the NFL and NIH regarding this research project, according to the committee report. Those representatives included Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, cochairman of the league’s Head, Neck, and Spine Committee.The NFL said in a statement that “concerns were raised for review and consideration through the appropriate channels.”Jeff Miller, the NFL’s executive vice president of health and safety, told the congressional investigators that Nabel and Ellenbogen believed they raised their concerns “in the most appropriate way, and this back-and-forth over the grants process was hardly unusual,” according to the report.Nabel said in her statement, “The members of the NFL’s Head, Neck, and Spine Committee acted appropriately.”The committee report said that Koroshetz disagreed with Miller’s characterization, and said he “was aware of no other instance where a donor raised objections to a grantee prior to the issuance of a notice of grant award.” Related: Privacy Policy BusinessHospital exec Nabel, criticized for her work with NFL, defends her neutrality Dr. Elizabeth Nabel, president of Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and one of the nation’s most prominent medical executives, was part of a National Football League effort to “steer funding” for a landmark concussion study away from a group of respected brain researchers, according to a congressional committee report that was sharply critical of the league.The report found that the NFL “inappropriately attempted to influence” the National Institutes of Health’s grant selection process.Nabel, who also serves as the NFL’s chief health and medical advisor, told STAT she “had no intention of influencing” the NIH process. “I made my neutrality quite clear,” she said in a statement.advertisement “The NFL’s characterization of the appropriateness of its actions suggests a lack of understanding of the importance of the NIH’s independent peer review process,” the committee report states.Nabel’s spokeswoman said Koroshetz never told Nabel her actions were inappropriate. “In fact, all of their interactions were very collegial and cordial,” she said.Arthur Caplan, a professor of bioethics at New York University, said Nabel’s actions, as described in the report, risk harming Nabel’s reputation and that of the Brigham. “When she did anything to try to shape the selection of investigators or challenge the objectivity” of the grant selection process, he said, “she had to know that that was 100 percent inappropriate, 100 percent unacceptable.”On Tuesday, Ellenbogen sent a letter to members of the committee saying that the reports’ allegation that he “and others participated in an effort to influence an NIH grant selection process” could not “be further from the truth.” He said that he was not contacted by the committee staff. Released on Monday, the report was written by the Democratic staff of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.It cited a series of communications between NFL representatives, including Nabel, and officials of the NIH, and a foundation that accepts gifts from private donors to support NIH research. The discussions began after the NIH decided last year to award a $16 million grant to a research team led by Dr. Robert Stern of Boston University — but before the award was publicly announced.advertisement The money for the grant was to come from a donation pledged by the NFL to the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, and league officials say they were concerned about aspects of Stern’s group and the proposed study.Research by Stern’s team and BU colleagues has helped establish a link between football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, long-term brain damage that’s been observed in a growing number of athletes, including former NFL players, who suffered repeated head injuries.Nabel, who knows the NIH well from her 10 years working as a high-level manager in the agency, sent two emails to Dr. Walter Koroshetz, director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, according to the report. That’s the NIH branch that was awarding the grant.In one email on June 23, 2015, she wrote, “I am taking a neutral stance here,” while noting a concern about a potential conflict of interest: members of the NIH grant review panel had coauthored papers with two researchers that she had heard might be receiving the grant — Dr. Ann McKee and Dr. Robert Cantu of BU. Related: Concussion, Inc.: The big business of treating brain injuries Tags Brigham and Women’s HospitalconcussionsNational Football LeagueNIHlast_img read more

‘The fallout has been all around me’: How becoming a doctor has taken a mental toll

first_img Earlier this year, I wrote about finding joy in medicine. Two doctors facetiously tweeted at me that they looked forward to an update after that first year had crushed me. “Losing joy” is an experience that is not uncommon.As Wallace said, “It is about simple awareness — awareness of what is so real and essential, so hidden in plain sight all around us, that we have to keep reminding ourselves, over and over: ‘This is water, this is water.’”This is our water — my profession needs to care for its people. We need to care for ourselves. But mostly, we need to look out for one another, to be there, in empathy and understanding. Support over survival. Be one another’s keeper. Mike Reddy for STAT By Jennifer Adaeze Okwerekwu Sept. 19, 2016 Reprints @JenniferAdaeze Off the Charts‘The fallout has been all around me’: How becoming a doctor has taken a mental toll Why are doctors plagued by depression and suicide? A crisis comes into focus About the Author Reprints Related: Related: Jennifer Adaeze Okwerekwu Tags depressiondoctorsHealth Disparitiesmedical school During my residency orientation at the Cambridge Health Alliance, I remember our program director telling us to look out for one another, to make sure that we psychiatry interns, all eight of us, had one another’s backs. Instinctively, I was worried — what did we need to protect one another from?But I knew.advertisement Columnist, Off the Charts Jennifer Adaeze Okwerekwu is a psychiatrist and a columnist for STAT. Here’s an idea that shouldn’t be radical: There can be joy in practicing medicine After successfully matching into the fellowship of her dreams, another friend told me that her terrible residency experience taught her how strong and confident she could be. She’s learned from the adversity and grown as a result of the challenges she faced, but I wonder, what was stolen from her in the process? I wonder how much more she could have blossomed as a physician if this growth was driven by support rather than survival.While interviewing for residency programs, I was repeatedly asked if I liked medical school — the grueling hours, the vast amounts of information I needed to have at my fingertips, the trial by fire when starting clinical work. My diplomatic answer: I was thankful for the opportunity but was happy I never had to do it again. It belied the dirty little secret that medicine is the best and worst thing that has happened to all of us — that we’ve survived the extremes of loneliness, anger, humiliation, or sadness because, “Hey, it’s OK. I’m going to be a doctor.”And now, as a first-year resident, I was being warned to keep an eye out for my colleagues — to become my co-intern’s keeper.This time, I told myself, I would get it right. Toward the end of my third year of medical school, a classmate tearfully confided her demolition at the hands of a cruel supervising physician. I told her it was OK, that it happened to all of us. I steeled myself against her sadness because it was too hard to think about the harsh realities of training. I’d lost my empathy to a plight that could very well have been my own.I was one of the young fish David Foster Wallace described in his commencement speech to the graduating class at Kenyon College. When asked by an older fish, “How’s the water?” the young fish wondered, “What the hell is water?”The young fish can’t see beyond their circumstances to appreciate the bigger picture. When it comes to our training, I was the next in a long line of physicians that would struggle to see what’s normal and healthy, and what is not. We don’t see that we are all in this mess together, and we deny ourselves the chance to see the pain for what it is, because we’ve collectively accepted it as part of being tough, being clinical. Being a doctor.In chronicling her long battle with brain cancer, the late writer Alison Piepmeier reflected on her experience in hospice care and asked: “How can I exist in this place, where I’m so grateful and so sad?” It’s the perfect articulation of a question I’ve wrestled with in one form or another every day for past 10 years as I progressed from a premedical student to a newly minted MD.While the medical profession can adopt policies to reduce the incidence of depression, I think, all of us, as members of a community, must take ownership of our collective mental health. Practicing medicine is a rare privilege that requires discipline, dedication, and sacrifice.Yet those traits are often incompatible with our social and emotional needs as human beings, and when we’ve reached our brink, it challenges that decision to heed the call. A few months ago, a friend and fellow resident in another program told me that after a long and stressful day at work she had to pull over on the highway because she couldn’t fight back the overwhelming urge to cry and didn’t want to drive at the same time.Nearly 400 physicians die by suicide each year. As the medical profession starts to look closely at burnout and depression among its ranks, the signs, the symptoms, the fallout have been all around me. I’ve spent the past few weeks tracing my own path to physicianhood, and diving into its toll on my well-being.advertisement [email protected] last_img read more

Glaxo to pay $20 million for bribing doctors in China

first_img By Ed Silverman Sept. 30, 2016 Reprints Pharmalot @Pharmalot Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED GlaxoSmithKline on Friday agreed to pay $20 million to settle charges of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act for what authorities called a pay-to-prescribe scheme in China. In doing so, Glaxo becomes the latest global drug maker to face such accusations as part of a long-running probe by US authorities into companies that paid bribes overseas in order to boost sales of their medicines.The settlement is an outgrowth of the bribery scandal that rocked Glaxo and resulted in a $490 million fine two years ago after a Chinese court found the company guilty of bribing doctors, hospital officials, and other non-governmental personnel. The former head of the Glaxo unit in China also pleaded guilty to bribery-related charges and was given a three-year suspended sentence. GET STARTED Ed Silverman What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included?center_img Tags bribesChinaGlaxoSmithKline About the Author Reprints Glaxo to pay $20 million for bribing doctors in China Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Log In | Learn More [email protected] last_img read more

Belgium conference to counter Trump’s anti-abortion plan

first_imgHealthBelgium conference to counter Trump’s anti-abortion plan Tags women’s health Philanthropists and private donors will be asked to contribute at the conference, she said.The US ban on performing or even talking about abortions has been instituted by Republican administrations and rescinded by Democratic ones since 1984. Former President Barack Obama last lifted it in 2009.Belgium, for example, already has teenage pregnancy programs in Mali and Niger, and works with U.N. organizations in Guinea for better family planning. De Croo insisted Trump would only achieve the opposite of what he wanted since it would lead to more loss of life instead of saving lives through illegal abortions and life-threatening medical procedures.— Raf CasertJan M. Olsen contributed from Copenhagen. Please enter a valid email address. Leave this field empty if you’re human: Sweden is a co-organizer of the conference and Deputy Prime Minister Isabella Lovin told Swedish Public radio that the meeting was “about having the countries standing together and talk about how important it is that sufficient funding should go to sexual and reproductive health and rights.”advertisement By Associated Press Feb. 9, 2017 Reprints Belgium’s minister for foreign trade and development, Alexander De Croo, said that the conference will “join forces and rally support for all these efforts that make sexual and reproductive health and rights a reality for millions of women and girls around the world.” Privacy Policy BRUSSELS — Belgium is organizing an international conference next month to finance access to birth control, abortion, and sex education for women in developing countries in an attempt to make up for President Trump’s ban on US funding.The government said Thursday that it will host the “She Decides” meeting on March 2, and so far, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Denmark have already committed a combined $32 million to the policies Trump vehemently opposes.Trump’s decision last month banned US funding to international groups that perform abortions or even provide information about abortions. It immediately drew sharp rebukes in Europe and became one of the flashpoints highlighting the deepening trans-Atlantic rift.advertisement Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Associated Press About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

Pharmalittle: Axovant Alzheimer’s pill fails study; charity probed over patient support

first_img Tags neurologypharmaceuticalspharmalittleSTAT+ Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED [email protected] By Ed Silverman Sept. 26, 2017 Reprints GET STARTED Pharmalittle: Axovant Alzheimer’s pill fails study; charity probed over patient support What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What is it? Ed Silvermancenter_img Hello, everyone, and how are you today? We are just fine, thank you, despite a bit of road lag after taking a late-night drive to the town where our corporate nerve center is located. A change of pace is a good thing, of course, although we must now forage for cups of stimulation. Then again, this could be an adventure. Speaking of which, the news is always full of adventure. To prove the point, here are some tidbits. Hope your day is delightful and do keep in touch …An Axovant Sciences (AXON) pill being tested to blunt Alzheimer’s failed in a late-stage clinical trial, STAT tells us. In the study involving more than 1,300 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s, the combination of intepirdine and Aricept failed to outpace the older drug alone, missing key goals of improving memory and physical function. The news wiped out about 70 percent of its market value in early-morning trading. The drug maker was worth more than $2.6 billion before the news of the failure. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Alex Hogan/STAT About the Author Reprints Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. @Pharmalot Pharmalot last_img read more

FDA has to explain why Amgen was denied a key marketing incentive

first_img GET STARTED What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Log In | Learn More Did the Food and Drug Administration treat Amgen (AMGN) differently than Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) when reviewing applications for their drugs?A federal judge ruled late last week that the agency, in fact, may have acted inconsistently when it denied pediatric exclusivity for a blockbuster Amgen drug and ordered the FDA to explain its reasoning. The ruling could mean that Amgen may eventually win six months of pediatric exclusivity, which would allow the company to forestall generic competition to a best-selling drug. About the Author Reprints By Ed Silverman Jan. 30, 2018 Reprints Tags legalpharmaceuticalspolicySTAT+ Pharmalot [email protected] center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What’s included? Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Ric Francis/AP Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Ed Silverman @Pharmalot FDA has to explain why Amgen was denied a key marketing incentive last_img read more

LISTEN: A genome-editing first, Trump on Wall Street, and biotech red flags

first_img What is it? Tags podcast Can genome-editing work in actual people? Are CEOs oversharing? And how do you sniff out a bad bet before it happens?We discuss all that and more in the latest episode of “The Readout LOUD,” STAT’s biotech podcast. Tune in for a conversation on Sangamo Therapeutics and its much-anticipated peek at results from a genome-editing trial. Then we talk about President Trump’s plan to change how often public companies have to spill their guts and what it could mean for biotech. Greg Yap, a partner at Menlo Ventures, joins us to dish on the red flags that dissuade him from a potential biotech investment, and we embark on a lightning round with appearances by bad cholesterol, CAR-T, and a diagnostic menstrual pad. LISTEN: A genome-editing first, Trump on Wall Street, and biotech red flags By Damian Garde and Rebecca Robbins Aug. 23, 2018 Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included? The Readout LOUD Damian Garde Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. GET STARTED About the Authors Reprints [email protected] National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. @damiangarde Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Log In | Learn More last_img read more

Turning the tables, people with mental illness share what they want scientists to study

first_img News Editor Patients are usually the subject of scientific studies, not the designers. But a new effort is trying to bring patients’ priorities to the forefront in research on mental health.For months, the Milken Institute and the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance have been collecting the perspectives of patients with depression or bipolar disorder. The first-of-its-kind survey poses a question patients don’t often get asked: What questions about your health and experience with depression or bipolar disorder would you most like research to help you answer?The responses have poured in. Since launching the survey in August, more than 5,600 people have taken part.advertisement STAT [email protected] Exclusive analysis of biopharma, health policy, and the life sciences. Most respondents, 73 percent, said depression or bipolar disorder has taken a significant toll over their lifetime. Just under half said it has caused a significant impact over the past year; 34 percent, over the past month; and 22 percent, that day.Altimus said it’s critical for researchers, drug companies, and organizations that fund studies to take patients’ considerations into account in their work. Melissa Stevens, executive director of the Milken Institute Center for Strategic Philanthropy, said she is hopeful that the final report on the survey — expected out early next year — will push the research community in that direction.“We hope that foundations, the NIH, and pharma companies can really use this to see the pulse of the patient community,” she said. “The hardest thing I’ve gone through with my med team is the trial and error of medications,” one respondent wrote. “I’ve felt like a guinea pig for years. It would be nice to have only had to go through one med and had it work.” Related: Tags mental health STAT+: “As we think about what the goals are in research and developing new therapeutics, those goals need to be in alignment with what people with these conditions are really seeking,” she said.On Wednesday, the research team will present some of their preliminary findings at the Milken Institute Future of Health Summit in Washington. Both people with depression and those with bipolar disorder said that good treatments are their top priority. But there was another answer that quite frequently cropped up.“They just want to know what’s causing it,” said Altimus.The research also suggests that roughly two-thirds of people report first experiencing symptoms of their condition during adolescence. The younger a respondent was, the more likely they were to report an adolescent onset, though it’s not clear why that’s the case. Experts say the Milken Institute’s work is a sign of a cultural shift that places more emphasis on the patient’s perspective in research.“The entire field is moving toward listening to people and finding out what they want,” said Dr. Ken Duckworth, the medical director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. “Designing research studies, we should involve the patients quite directly.”The survey also asked people to define what wellness means to them. Broadly speaking, respondents named two big factors: the ability to function and physical health.“It means stability; well enough to hold a job, well enough to enjoy activities, well enough to feel joy and hope,” one person wrote.“Feeling physically healthy. Not having my day-to-day life interrupted by my conditions,” another said. About the Author Reprints Ketamine gives hope to patients with severe depression. But some clinics stray from the science and hype its benefits Related: Cara Altimus — an associate director at the Milken Institute Center for Strategic Philanthropy who helped manage the project — said those voices are critical to research and drug development.advertisement Megan Thielking HealthTurning the tables, people with mental illness share what they want scientists to study By Megan Thielking Oct. 24, 2018 Reprints Companies are racing to develop fast-acting depression drugs — but the process is tricky @meggophone last_img read more

Startup Spotlight: Juno, Vir alum starts a new immunotherapy company

first_img What is it? A Juno Therapeutics and Vir Biotechnology founder may be about to launch a new company with his family.Dr. Larry Corey and two apparent family members, Dr. Daniel Corey and Jordan Corey, have started a new San Francisco-based immunotherapy company called CERo Therapeutics, according to SEC filings. The company raised $43 million in mid-November, per those filings. It has raised a total of $45 million since its incorporation in 2016. Biotech Kate Sheridan Startup Spotlight: Juno, Vir alum starts a new immunotherapy company Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @sheridan_kate What’s included?center_img [email protected] Alex Hogan/STAT GET STARTED By Kate Sheridan Dec. 2, 2019 Reprints About the Author Reprints General Assignment Reporter Kate covers biotech startups and the venture capital firms that back them. Log In | Learn More Tags biotechnologyimmunotherapySTAT+last_img read more

New drug from Merck, Bayer reduces hospitalizations for heart failure patients

first_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. An experimental drug from Merck and Bayer cut hospitalizations for heart failure by 10% in a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented virtually by the American College of Cardiology on Sunday.“I think we need to sit back and acknowledge that we have another win in the treatment of heart failure,” Clyde Yancy, chief of cardiology at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine, said on the ACC’s webcast, speaking about the drug, vericiguat. Matthew Herper What’s included? Health Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED About the Author Reprints @matthewherper STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTEDcenter_img Log In | Learn More New drug from Merck, Bayer reduces hospitalizations for heart failure patients By Matthew Herper March 28, 2020 Reprints Tags cardiologySTAT+ [email protected] Senior Writer, Medicine, Editorial Director of Events Matthew covers medical innovation — both its promise and its perils. Adobe What is it?last_img read more