Aston Villa midfielder signs new five-year deal

first_imgAshley Westwood has penned a new five-year contract at Aston Villa, the Premier League club have announced.The 25-year-old midfielder moved to Villa Park from Crewe in 2012 and has gone on to establish himself in the first-team picture.And having played all of Saturday’s opening day win at Bournemouth, Westwood has now committed himself to Villa for the foreseeable future.“I am extremely pleased to sign a new contract and commit my future to Aston Villa,” he told the club’s official website.“I was made to feel very welcome from the moment I first walked through the door and I’m very happy at the club.“I believe I’m now entering what I hope will be the peak years of my career and I look forward to spending them here.” 1 Aston Villa midfielder Ashley Westwood last_img

Carbon Nanotube Windmills Powered by Electron Wind

first_img Explore further The proposed (a) nanomotor and (b) nanodrill, where the red inner CNT rotates due to an electron wind. The nanomotor is attached to gold electrodes, which act as electron reservoirs, while the nanodrill has one end contacted to a mercury electrode. Credit: S.W.D. Bailey, et al. Tiny tubes move into the fast lane As Steven Bailey, Ilias Amanatidis, and Colin Lambert explain in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters, the new drive mechanism could be useful for future NEMS (nanoelectromechanical structures) technologies. “[Previously,] thoughts have been directed towards ‘pushing’ the motor to make it turn, whereas our suggestion harnesses an intrinsic property of the device: the change in momentum of electrons or phonons, for example,” Bailey told PhysOrg.com.The researchers describe the proposed nanomotor as a carbon nanotube (CNT) windmill, although the device looks more like a telescope than the conventional spinning blades of a windmill. It consists of a double-walled CNT, where the outer tube is clamped to two external electrodes, and the shorter inner tube is free to move and rotate. In a version called the CNT drill, the outer tube is clamped to just one electrode, while one end of the free inner tube is in contact with a mercury electrode, but is still free to rotate. The devices are called windmills because they’re powered by an applied dc voltage between the electrodes, which produces a “wind” of electrons.As it moves through the CNT, the flow of electrons acquires angular momentum, producing a tangential force that causes the inner nanotube to rotate. The researchers calculated that the electron wind can produce a force that significantly exceeds the inter-wall friction – sometimes by as much as three orders of magnitude. Depending on the applied voltage, the rotating inner tube can reach CNT breakdown velocities of up to 8,000 meters per second.The electron-wind-powered nanomotor could have a range of applications. For instance, by using a voltage pulse to make the inner tube rotate at a specific angle, it could be used as a switch or memory element in nanoscale magnetic memory devices; or, by putting the CNT in contact with a reservoir of atoms or molecules, the nanomotor could act as a nanofluidic pump.The physicists also suggest that the motor could be powered in different ways. In one possibility, the electrodes could be replaced with reservoirs of atoms or molecules. Then, an applied pressure difference could drive the atoms or molecules across the CNT, and their angular momentum could cause the inner tube to rotate. Similarly, a temperature difference between the ends of the CNT could create a flux of phonons that could also drive the motor. Other CNT-based nanomotors have been developed, including multi-walled CNTs with a similar structure to the CNT windmill. However, these previous designs have been powered by electrostatic forces that require metallic plates and gates, which aren’t needed in the new design. The researchers hope that the efficiency and simplicity of the CNT windmills will provide advantages over electrostatic and other nanomotors in the future.“The capability to engineer nanoscale motors is at the same stage as that of microscale motors in the 1990s,” Bailey said. “The manufacturing techniques to deal with the very low dimensions are always playing catch up with experimental groups, which are making very rapid progress, and we predict that to test out the CNT windmill will not require much change to established procedures within these groups. Indeed, there should be much less construction involved in making the nanomotor devices. The engineering simplicity of the CNT windmill will be the greatest advantage in the future.”More information: Bailey, S.W.D; Amanatidis, I.; and Lambert, C.J. “Carbon Nanotube Electron Windmills: A Novel Design for Nanomotors.” Physical Review Letters 100, 256802 (2008).Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Theoretical physicists from Lancaster University in the UK have designed a nanomotor that operates by a novel mechanism: an electron wind. Citation: Carbon Nanotube Windmills Powered by ‘Electron Wind’ (2008, July 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-07-carbon-nanotube-windmills-powered-electron.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Sony unveils 3D and color epaper displays at this weeks SID 2011

first_img Sony’s 13.3 inch flexible color e-paper. Explore further Sony’s 3D displays come in a 10 inch and 23 inch size and can deliver a 3D image without the use of any special glasses. The method uses a backlight for 3D images positioned between an LCD panel and a backlight for normal 2D images. Switching between 2D and 3D is accomplished by lighting one of the two backlights.The backlight for the 3D images are LED’s placed on the light guide plate and its edges. On the light guide plate scatter patterns are produced at even intervals in the horizontal direction to direct light to the outside. More information: At the 49th SID International Symposium, Seminar & Exhibition Sony unveiled their new 3D glasses free display and flexible color e-paper. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Sony’s 3D 10 inch and 23 inch displays deliver 3D images without the use of any special glasses. The 3D effect is produced by the LED light sources being reflected on the scatter patterns to go to the back side of the panel as if lights are partially controlled by using “parallax barriers.” The result shows different images to the right and left eye. Sony’s 24-inch 3D LCD display has six viewpoints, and its pixel count is 960 x 360, and its brightness is 86.1cd/m2. 3D images are best viewed between distances of 80 to 160cm. The 2D mode, the pixel count of the display becomes 1,920 x 1,080 and has a brightness of 192cd/m2.Sony states that the new method can be applied to displays between 4 to 30 inches and hopes to commercialize it within a few years.center_img via Tech-On e-paper, Tech-On 3D display Sharp Introduces 3D LCD Color Monitor that provides a stereoscopic display Citation: Sony unveils 3D and color e-paper displays at this week’s SID 2011 (2011, May 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-sony-unveils-3d-e-paper-week.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — Sony unveiled a 13.3 inch flexible color e-paper device and two glass free 3D displays. The announcement was made at the 49th SID International Symposium, Seminar & Exhibition which is the world’s largest academic conference on display technologies. The conference is being held this week in Los Angeles, CA (USA). Sony’s 13.3 inch flexible color e-paper has a thickness of 150 microns and weighs 20g and uses a plastic substrate. The e-paper display has a 13% color gamut (NTSC), a reflectance of 10% and a 100,000:1 contrast ratio.The display’s 800 x 1200 pixel array consists of red, green, blue, and white sub-pixels. The sub-pixel measures 169 microns x 169 microns and the resolution and gradation of the screen are 75ppi and 16, respectively.The e-paper display is manufactured by applying adhesive to the glass substrate and attaching a plastic substrate. Amorphous TFTs are then formed on it with a180°C or lower temperature process. The plastic substrate is then finally removed from the glass substrate.last_img read more

BlackBerry plots to release two midrange Android smartphones this year

first_imgBlackberry Priv. Image Credit: BBC Advertisement After launching the Blackberry Priv last year on November 6th, Blackberry Ltd. is reportedly cooking up on two mid-range Android smartphones, that are expected to be released by the end of this year.During an exclusive interview to The National website, John S. Chen, Blackberry CEO, said that one smartphone will sport a full touchscreen and the other will come with a QWERTY keyboard.In terms of specs, nothing else was mentioned. He further added that the phones will be priced around $300 (1,005,000 UGX) to $400 (1,340,000 UGX). – Advertisement – First Post reports that John also spoke about the Priv and how it was “too high-end product” for the enterprise and that’s the reason as to why it has received a recent price cut. So, the price is slashed to $649 (2,174,150 UGX) from $699 (2,341,650 UGX).CEO John S. Chen during the launch of the Blackberry Priv. Image Credit: DigitalTrendsAccording to ZDNet, news of the new BlackBerry devices comes after a disappointing earnings report from BlackBerry in early April. The company reported 600,000 handsets during the first quarter of 2016, below an analyst consensus of 850,000.It’s not clear how many of those devices were the high-end Priv, rather than lower-priced handsets in developing markets. [related-posts]last_img read more